Chestnut Herbal School

Violet

Foraging for Wild Edibles and Herbs: Sustainable and Safe Gathering Practices

We herbalists have a unique take on the commonest of herbs: instead of dismissing them as mundane or maddening, we choose to embrace wily botanicals with enchantment and enterprise. These medicinal and edible weeds—vulgar villains to most—are the herbalists’ beloveds. This alchemical perspective, transforming the unplanned and uninvited into a veritable treasure, is a handy approach in life that needn’t be limited to weeds.

Violet’s Edible and Medicinal Uses

Violets are welcome “weeds” in my garden. In fact, the common blue violet—my particular brand of violet garden guest—is native to these parts, which is more than I can say for myself. The common blue violet (Viola sororia, Violaceae) is native to most of central and eastern North America. It is a common sight in lawns, gardens, sidewalk cracks and along trailsides. The common blue violet is typically considered a “weed” because of its relative ease in adapting to human disturbance, but it pushes the definition of weed because it has been on this continent for a very long time. The leaves and flowers of the common blue violet, along with many other species, are edible and medicinal. The “confederate violet” is an escaped cultivar (cultivated variety) of Viola sororia—it has white flowers with blue streaks and is a common inhabitant of lawns in the southeastern United States.

Wild Greens Bagel

One of my favorite breakfast dishes; a heart-friendly, wild foods/herbal version of the classic toasted bagel – Violet leaves and flowers and chickweed greens with a raw garlic olive oil sauce atop a whole grain bagel. Both chickweed and violets are rich in anti-oxidant vitamins and the violet flowers are colored by bio-flavanoids. Both wild […]