Chestnut Herbal School

A Year in Flowers

Pink Lady’s Slipper (Cypripedium acaule)

Lady’s slipper orchids have a commanding presence—their inflated blooms are captivating to the point of heady swooning and inspiring colorful prose. The etymological root of the word orchid comes from the Greek orchis, meaning testicle. Certain species of orchid bear roots, which resemble paired testes. In pink lady’s slipper, it is the flower, and not the root, that is reminiscent of male naughty bits. Orchids typically have three petals, with one of the flower’s petals forming a pouch-like structure, aptly named the labellum. The Latin root of labellum, is little lip, or labia. In pink lady’s slipper the labellum is inflated and heavily veined. The other two petals are pink and narrow, twisting, and extending out to the side of the flower, like a dancer’s arms in mid-twirl.

Lavender’s Medicinal and Aromatherapy Uses and Lavender Truffles

Lavender's Medicinal and Aromatherapy Uses and Lavender TrufflesWritten and Photographed by Juliet Blankespoor - There are few scents in this world that evoke the feeling of clean - lavender is one of them. Its common and scientific name originates from lavare, the Latin word for wash or bathe. Lavender was popular as a linen-washing herb [...]

Developing the Heart

The following is a piece I wrote last year during the inception of the occupy movement. It may seem it has little to do with flowers, but in reality, everything has to do with flowers; from the food in our bellies, the heat and structure of our homes, the oxygen in our lungs.

Cannon ball tree flower

Cannonball tree – sea slug-esque flowers, Shiva’s tree and pre-columbian transoceanic voyages

I had seen pictures of the cannonball tree (Couroupita guianensis, Lecythidaceae) in my tropical plant books for years, always with its large distinctive cannonball-esque fruits. But I had never seen a picture of the flowers, and so the first time I laid eyes on its gargantuan blooms at Fairchild Tropical Gardens in Florida, I was completely and utterly awed and enchanted.

Calendula officinalis

Calendula’s Herbal & Edible Uses: How to Grow, Gather, and Prepare Calendula as Food and Medicine

Calendula officinalis is one of the easiest-to-grow medicinal herbs and so versatile in its healing properties that it invariably finds its way into the hearts and gardens of all herb lovers. It is typically grown as an annual, but can be cultivated as a short-lived perennial in warmer climes (Zone 8-10).

Red Powder Puff

Even Red Powder Puff Has Bad Hair Days

The showiness of this flower does not come from its petals, but instead from its male flower parts. The filaments are the stalks of the stamens (pollen bearing structures). In this flower they are doing double duty by also attracting pollinators. This genus has diminutive petals but many of the powder puff-type legume flowers in the tropics have lost their petals and only have showy stamens.

Witch Hazel (Hamamelis viriginiana) photo

Witch Hazel’s Medicinal Uses

Witch Hazel’s Medicinal UsesWritten by Juliet Blankespoor with Meghan Gemma Photographed by Juliet Blankespoor - When witch hazel flowers in late fall, its leaves are either golden with the season’s splendor or have already fallen to join the rich tapestry of the eastern deciduous forest floor. Its yellow petals resemble crimped streamers, lending a wild [...]